Posts Tagged ‘poetry’

William Skakespeare

Posted: April 24, 2013 in poetry
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CARPE DIEM
WILLIAM SHAKESPEARE

O mistress mine, where are you roaming?
O stay and hear! your true-love’s coming
That can sing both high and low;
Trip no further, pretty sweeting,
Journey’s end in lovers’ meeting–
Every wise man’s son doth know.

What is love? ’tis not hereafter;
Present mirth hath present laughter;
What’s to come is still unsure:
In delay there lies no plenty,–
Then come kiss me, Sweet and twenty,
Youth’s a stuff will not endure.

William_Shakespeare_1609

WILLIAM SHAKESPEARE
26 April 1564 (baptised) – 23 April 1616

Little is known about Shakespeare’s early years. His father, John Shakespeare, was a glover and dealer in commodities and was a man of some standing in the local community. His mother,Mary Arden, was of higher social class. Shakespeare seems to have attended the local grammar school at Stratcord-upon-Avon, where he was born, but no records remain.

In 1582, Shakespeare married Anne Hathaway, who was eight years older than he was, and they had three children by 1594: Susanna, and twins Hamnet and Judith. However, he became a leading member of the newly formed acting company the Lord Chamberlain’s Men (who became the King’ Men at the acession of James I) and he remained with them for the rest of his career. In 1599 the company occupied the Globe Theatre in London and 1608 took over Blackfriars as a winter house. Shakespeare lived and worked in London, but this family remained in Stratford. Shakespeare produced most of his known work between 1589 and 1613. His early plays were mainly comedies and histories, genres he raised to the peak of sophistication and artistry by the end of the 16th century. He then wrote mainly tragedies until about 1608, including Hamlet, King Lear, Othello, and Macbeth, considered some of the finest works in the English language. In his last phase, he wrote tragicomedies, also known as romances, and collaborated with other playwrights.

Shakespeare died on 23 April 1616. He was a respected poet and playwright in his own day, but his reputation did not rise to its present heights until the 19th century. The Romantics, in particular, acclaimed Shakespeare’s genius, and the Victorians worshipped Shakespeare with a reverence that George Bernard Shaw called “bardolatry”. In the 20th century, his work was repeatedly adopted and rediscovered by new movements in scholarship and performance. Shakeaspeare’s plays are still performed with more regularity than those of any other playwright and film versions frequently appear.

FIVE SHAKESPEARE’S SONNETS TO YOU ENJOY THE DAY

90

From you have I been absent in the spring… (Sonnet 98)

From you have I been absent in the spring,
When proud-pied April, dressed in all his trim,
Hath put a spirit of youth in everything,
That heavy Saturn laughed and leaped with him,
Yet nor the lays of birds, nor the sweet smell
Of different flowers in odor and in hue,
Could make me any summer’s story tell,
Or from their proud lap pluck them where they grew.
Nor did I wonder at the lily’s white,
Nor praise the deep vermilion in the rose;
They were but sweet, but figures of delight,
Drawn after you, you pattern of all those.
 Yet seemed it winter still, and, you away,
 As with your shadow I with these did play.

161
My mistress’ eyes are nothing like the sun (Sonnet 130)

My mistress’ eyes are nothing like the sun;
Coral is far more red than her lips’ red;
If snow be white, why then her breasts are dun;
If hairs be wires, black wires grow on her head.
I have seen roses damasked, red and white,
But no such roses see I in her cheeks;
And in some perfumes is there more delight
Than in the breath that from my mistress reeks.
I love to hear her speak, yet well I know
That music hath a far more pleasing sound;
I grant I never saw a goddess go;
My mistress when she walks treads on the ground.
 And yet, by heaven, I think my love as rare
 As any she belied with false compare.

60
Not from the stars do I my judgment pluck (Sonnet 14)

 Not from the stars do I my judgment pluck,
And yet methinks I have astronomy;
But not to tell of good or evil luck,
Of plagues, of dearths, or seasons’ quality;
Nor can I fortune to brief minutes tell,
Pointing to each his thunder, rain, and wind,
Or say with princes if it shall go well
By oft predict that I in heaven find.
But from thine eyes my knowledge I derive,
And, constant stars, in them I read such art
As truth and beauty shall together thrive
If from thyself to store thou wouldst convert:
 Or else of thee this I prognosticate,
 Thy end is truth’s and beauty’s doom and date.

183
Shall I compare thee to a summer’s day? (Sonnet 18)

Shall I compare thee to a summer’s day?
Thou art more lovely and more temperate.
Rough winds do shake the darling buds of May,
And summer’s lease hath all too short a date.
Sometime too hot the eye of heaven shines,
And often is his gold complexion dimmed;
And every fair from fair sometime declines,
By chance, or nature’s changing course, untrimmed;
But thy eternal summer shall not fade,
Nor lose possession of that fair thou ow’st,
Nor shall death brag thou wand’rest in his shade,
When in eternal lines to Time thou grow’st.
 So long as men can breathe, or eyes can see,
 So long lives this, and this gives life to thee.

186

Sonnet 100: Where art thou, Muse, that thou forget’st so long

 Where art thou, Muse, that thou forget’st so long
To speak of that which gives thee all thy might?
Spend’st thou thy fury on some worthless song,
Darkening thy power to lend base subjects light?
Return, forgetful Muse, and straight redeem
In gentle numbers time so idly spent;
Sing to the ear that doth thy lays esteem,
And gives thy pen both skill and argument.
Rise, resty Muse, my love’s sweet face survey
If time have any wrinkle graven there;
If any, be a satire to decay,
And make time’s spoils despisèd everywhere.
 Give my love fame faster than Time wastes life;
 So thou prevent’st his scythe and crooked knife.

99
Source: www.poemhunter.com

Honor to Woman, a poem by Schiller

Posted: March 8, 2013 in poetry, women
Tags: ,

8th March, International Woman’s Day.

HONOR TO WOMAN
by Friedrich von Schiller (1759-1805)

Honor to woman! To her it is given
To garden the earth with the roses of heaven!
All blessed, she linketh the loves in their choir
In the veil of the graces her beauty concealing,
She tends on each altar that’s hallowed to feeling,
And keeps ever-living the fire!

2230

From the bounds of truth careering,
Man’s strong spirit wildly sweeps,
With each hasty impulse veering
Down to passion’s troubled deeps.
And his heart, contented never,
Greeds to grapple with the far,
Chasing his own dream forever,
On through many a distant star!
But woman with looks that can charm and enchain,
Lureth back at her beck the wild truant again,
By the spell of her presence beguiled–
In the home of the mother her modest abode,
And modest the manners by Nature bestowed
On Nature’s most exquisite child!

2169

Bruised and worn, but fiercely breasting,
Foe to foe, the angry strife;
Man, the wild one, never resting,
Roams along the troubled life;
What he planneth, still pursuing;
Vainly as the Hydra bleeds,
Crest the severed crest renewing–
Wish to withered wish succeeds.

But woman at peace with all being, reposes,
And seeks from the moment to gather the roses–
Whose sweets to her culture belong.
Ah! richer than he, though his soul reigneth o’er
The mighty dominion of genius and lore,
And the infinite circle of song.

2298

Strong, and proud, and self-depending,
Man’s cold bosom beats alone;
Heart with heart divinely blending,
In the love that gods have known,
Soul’s sweet interchange of feeling,
Melting tears–he never knows,
Each hard sense the hard one steeling,
Arms against a world of foes.

Alive, as the wind-harp, how lightly soever
If wooed by the zephyr, to music will quiver,
Is woman to hope and to fear;
All, tender one! still at the shadow of grieving,
How quiver the chords–how thy bosom is heaving–
How trembles thy glance through the tear!

2173

Man’s dominion, war and labor;
Might to right the statue gave;
Laws are in the Scythian’s sabre;
Where the Mede reigned–see the slave!
Peace and meekness grimly routing,
Prowls the war-lust, rude and wild;
Eris rages, hoarsely shouting,
Where the vanished graces smiled.

But woman, the soft one, persuasively prayeth–
Of the life that she charmeth, the sceptre she swayeth;
She lulls, as she looks from above,
The discord whose bell for its victims is gaping,
And blending awhile the forever escaping,
Whispers hate to the image of love!

2251

A DIGNIDADE DAS MULHERES
Tradução para o Português: Maria do Sameiro Barroso

Honrai as mulheres! Elas entrançam e tecem
Rosas sublimes na vida terrena,
Entrançam do amor o venturoso laço
E, através do véu casto das Graças,
Alimentam, vigilantes, o fogo eterno
De sentimentos mais belos, com mão sagrada.

2216

Nos limites eternos da Verdade, o homem
Vagueia sem cessar, na sua rebeldia,
Impelido por pensamentos inquietos,
Precipita-se no oceano da sua fantasia.
Com avidez agarra o longe,
Seu coração jamais conhece a calma,
Incessante, em estrelas distantes,
Busca a imagem do seu sonho.
Mas, com olhares de encanto e fascínio,
As mulheres chamam a si o fugitivo,
Trazendo-o a mais avisados caminhos.
Na mais modesta cabana materna
Foram deixadas, com modos mais brandos,
As filhas fiéis da Natureza piedosa.

2214

Adverso é o esforço do homem,
Com força desmesurada,
Sem paragem nem descanso,
Atravessa o rebelde a sua vida.
Logo destrói tudo o que alcança;
Jamais termina o seu desejo de luta.
Jamais, como cabeça da Hidra,
Eternamente cai e se renova.

Mas, felizes, entre mais calmos rumores,
Irrompem as mulheres, num instante de flores,
Propiciando zelo e cuidadoso amor,
Mais livres, no seu concertado agir,
Mais propensas que o homem à sabedoria
E ao círculo infindável da poesia.

2291

Severo, orgulhoso, autárcico,
O peito frio do homem não conhece
Efusivo coração que a outro se ajuste,
Nem o amor, deleite dos deuses,
Das almas desconhece a permuta,
Às lágrimas não se entrega nunca,
A própria luta pela vida tempera
Com mais rudeza ainda a sua força.

Mas, como que tocada ao de leve pelo Zéfiro,
Célere, a harpa eólica estremece,
Tal é a alma sensível da mulher.
Com angustiada ternura, perante o sofrimento,
O seu seio amoroso vibra, nos seus olhos
Brilham pérolas de orvalho sublime.

2274

Nos reinos do poder masculino,
Vence, por direito, a força,
Pela espada se impõe o cita
E escravo se torna o persa,
Esgrimem-se entre si, em fúria,
Ambições selvagens, rudes,
E a voz rouca de Éris domina,
Quando a Cárite se põe em fuga.

Porém, com modos brandos e persuasivos,
As mulheres conduzem o ceptro dos costumes,
Acalmam a discórdia que, raivosa, se inflama,
Às forças hostis que se odeiam
Ensinam a maneira de ser harmoniosa,
E reúnem o que no eterno se derrama.

2217

Spring

Posted: June 2, 2012 in nude, photo, poetry, women
Tags: , , ,

Five short poems about Spring. Enjoy.

SPRING
by William Blake

Sound the Flute!
Now it’s mute.
Birds delight
Day and Night
Nightingale
In the dale
Lark in Sky
Merrily
Merrily Merrily to welcome in the Year

Little Boy
Full of joy,
Little Girl
Sweet and small,
Cock does crow
So do you.
Merry voice
Infant noise
Merrily Merrily to welcome in the Year

Little Lamb
Here I am.
Come and lick
My white neck.
Let me pull
Your soft Wool.
Let me kiss
Your soft face
Merrily Merrily we welcome in the Year

A PRAYER IN SPRING
by Robert Frost

OH, give us pleasure in the flowers today;
And give us not to think so far away
As the uncertain harvest; keep us here
All simply in the springing of the year.

Oh, give us pleasure in the orcahrd white,
Like nothing else by day, like ghosts by night;
And make us happy in the happy bees,
The swarm dilating round the perfect trees.

And make us happy in the darting bird
That suddenly above the bees is heard,
The meteor that thrusts in with needle bill,
And off a blossom in mid air stands still.

For this is love and nothing else is love,
To which it is reserved for God above
To sanctify to what far ends he will,
But which it only needs that we fulfill.

SONNET 98: FROM YOU HAVE I BEEN ABSENT IN THE SPRING
by William Shakespeare

From you have I been absent in the spring,
When proud-pied April, dressed in all his trim,
Hath put a spirit of youth in every thing,
That heavy Saturn laughed and leaped with him.
Yet nor the lays of birds, nor the sweet smell
Of different flowers in odour and in hue
Could make me any summer’s story tell,
Or from their proud lap pluck them where they grew.
Nor did I wonder at the lily’s white,
Nor praise the deep vermilion in the rose;
They were but sweet, but figures of delight
Drawn after you, you pattern of all those.
Yet seemed it winter still, and you away,
As with your shadow I with these did play.

FLOWER GOD, GOD OF THE SPRING
by Robert Louis Stevenson

Flower god, god of the spring, beautiful, bountiful,
Cold-dyed shield in the sky, lover of versicles,
Here I wander in April
Cold, grey-headed; and still to my
Heart, Spring comes with a bound, Spring the deliverer,
Spring, song-leader in woods, chorally resonant;
Spring, flower-planter in meadows,
Child-conductor in willowy
Fields deep dotted with bloom, daisies and crocuses:
Here that child from his heart drinks of eternity:
O child, happy are children!
She still smiles on their innocence,
She, dear mother in God, fostering violets,
Fills earth full of her scents, voices and violins:
Thus one cunning in music
Wakes old chords in the memory:
Thus fair earth in the Spring leads her performances.
One more touch of the bow, smell of the virginal
Green – one more, and my bosom
Feels new life with an ecstasy.

A LIGHT EXISTS IN SPRING
by Emily Dickinson

A Light exists in Spring
Not present on the Year
At any other period –
When March is scarcely here

A Color stands abroad
On Solitary Fields
That Science cannot overtake
But Human Nature feels.

It waits upon the Lawn,
It shows the furthest Tree
Upon the furthest Slope you know
It almost speaks to you.

Then as Horizons step
Or Noons report away
Without the Formula of sound
It passes and we stay –

A quality of loss
Affecting our Content
As Trade had suddenly encroached
Upon a Sacrament.

Photos: www.photodom.com
Texts: http://famouspoetsandpoems.com

The Moon

Posted: April 26, 2012 in poetry
Tags: , ,

5 short poems to the Queen of the Night…

THE SADNESS OF THE MOON (by Charles Baudelaire)

The Moon more indolently dreams to-night
Than a fair woman on her couch at rest,
Caressing, with a hand distraught and light,
Before she sleeps, the contour of her breast.

Upon her silken avalanche of down,
Dying she breathes a long and swooning sigh;
And watches the white visions past her flown,
Which rise like blossoms to the azure sky.

And when, at times, wrapped in her languor deep,
Earthward she lets a furtive tear-drop flow,
Some pious poet, enemy of sleep,

Takes in his hollow hand the tear of snow
Whence gleams of iris and of opal start,
And hides it from the Sun, deep in his heart.

THE FREEDOM OF THE MOON (by Robert Frost)

I’ve tried the new moon tilted in the air
Above a hazy tree-and-farmhouse cluster
As you might try a jewel in your hair.
I’ve tried it fine with little breadth of luster,
Alone, or in one ornament combining
With one first-water start almost shining.

I put it shining anywhere I please.
By walking slowly on some evening later,
I’ve pulled it from a crate of crooked trees,
And brought it over glossy water, greater,
And dropped it in, and seen the image wallow,
The color run, all sorts of wonder follow.

SONG OF THE MOON (by Claude McKay)

The moonlight breaks upon the city’s domes,
And falls along cemented steel and stone,
Upon the grayness of a million homes,
Lugubrious in unchanging monotone.
Upon the clothes behind the tenement,
That hang like ghosts suspended from the lines,
Linking each flat to each indifferent,
Incongruous and strange the moonlight shines.

There is no magic from your presence here,
Ho, moon, sad moon, tuck up your trailing robe,
Whose silver seems antique and so severe
Against the glow of one electric globe.

Go spill your beauty on the laughing faces
Of happy flowers that bloom a thousand hues,
Waiting on tiptoe in the wilding spaces,
To drink your wine mixed with sweet drafts of dews.

THE MOON (by Robert Louis Stevenson)

The moon has a face like the clock in the hall;
She shines on thieves on the garden wall,
On streets and fields and harbour quays,
And birdies asleep in the forks of the trees.

The squalling cat and the squeaking mouse,
The howling dog by the door of the house,
The bat that lies in bed at noon,
All love to be out by the light of the moon.

But all of the things that belong to the day
Cuddle to sleep to be out of her way;
And flowers and children close their eyes
Till up in the morning the sun shall arise.

TO THE MOON (by Giacomo Leopardi)

Oh gracious moon, now as the year turns,
I remember how, heavy with sorrow,
I climbed this hill to gaze on you,
And then as now you hung above those trees
Illuminating all. But to my eyes
Your face seemed clouded, temulous
From the tears that rose beneath my lids,
So painful was my life: and is, my
Dearest moon; its tenor does not change.
And yet, memory and numbering the epochs
Of my grief is pleasing to me. How welcome
In that youthful time -when hope’s span is long,
And memory short -is the remembrance even of
Past sad things whose pain endures.