2012: The Year of the Dragon

Posted: January 23, 2012 in calendars, news
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THE YEAR OF THE DRAGON

According to the Chinese Zodiac, the Year of 2012 is the Year of the Dragon, which begins on January 23, 2012 and ends on February 9, 2013.  The Dragon is the fifth sign of the Chinese Zodiac, which consists of 12 Animal signs.  The Dragon is a creature of myth and legend.  In ancient China, the celestial Dragon represents an emperor and power. Today, it is the ultimate auspicious symbol signifying success and happiness. May the celestial Dragon bring great good luck to everyone.

In Sung Dynasty (a Chinese imperial dynasty lasting from AD 960 – 1279) texts, the dragon is described as having the head of an ox, muzzle of a donkey, eyes of a shrimp, horns of a deer, body of a serpent covered with fish scales, and feet of a phoenix.  The dragon usually clutches a pearl symbolic of its super-natural powers.  Invariably accompanied by thunder and rain, dragons move like lightning and whirlwinds – all powerful yet totally unpredictable.

THE CHINESE CALENDAR

New Years this year falls on January 23, 2012. The Chinese calendar has come up with the third cultural hero, Huang-ti, the Yellow Lord, and was introduced in 2637 B.C. The Chinese calendar is different from the Gregorian (or western) calendar which begins each year on January 1st and ends on December 31st. The Chinese calendar based upon the (lunar) cycles of the moon and as a result, starts on a different date each year, between January 21st and February 19th. The lunar calendar repeats over twelve years.


Each of the twelve years on the lunar calendar is designated with an animal. In good astrological fashion, the animal representing the year you were born defines much about your personality and characteristics. This Chinese Zodiac, like its Western counterpart comprising the science of astrology (zodiac signs) and horoscopes, it even goes so far as to tell you best relate with or who you should marry. Read more about Chinese Horoscope.

THE SIGN OF THE DRAGON

People born in the Year of the Dragon share certain characteristics:  Innovative, enterprising, self-assured, brave, passionate, conceited, and quick-tempered. The Dragons are the free spirits of the Chinese Zodiac. Restrictions blow out their creative spark that is ready to flame into life.  So, they must be free and uninhibited.  The Dragon is a beautiful creature, colorful and flamboyant.  An extroverted bundle of energy, gifted and irrepressible, everything Dragons do is on a grand scale – big ideas and extreme ambitions.  However, this behavior is natural and isn’t meant for show.  Because they are confident, fearless in the face of challenge, they are almost inevitably successful.
People born in the Year of the Dragon usually make it to the top.  But, they must be aware of that too much enthusiasm can leave them tired and unfulfilled.  They find pleasure in helping others, and you can always count on their help.  Even though they are willing to assist when necessary, their pride can often impede them from accepting the same kind of help from others.  Their generous personalities give them the ability to attract friends, but they can be rather solitary people at heart.  Their self-sufficiency can mean that they have no need for close bonds with other people.

Dragon people tend to take thrilling risks, and burn the candle at both ends so they are fortunate to be blessed with good health.  However, they can suffer bad health as a result of excess stress.  Symtoms of their personalities often stem from emotional outbursts and can range from tension headaches to depression to hypertension.  They can remedy these problems by maintaining their cool, implementing a routine in their daily lives, and practice meditation, Tai Chi or Yoga that soothe the mind and spirit as well as tone the body.
The Dragon is not the most domesticated of the Animal signs.  So, people born in the Year of the Dragon prefer enjoying outdoor activities rather than staying at home.  They are extroverts who have a deep love for nature. Their homes should be as large and majestic as their personalities, providing space for the fiery temperament or emotional eruptions that accompany their character. They have true and sincere love, which comes from the depths of their hearts.
Dragon people are quite imaginative, always able to see new paths and will take a radical approach.  They have innate explorative spirit and try to succeed at one stroke. They are very adaptable and are fit for various occupations, especially if those occupations allow them to take the limelight. They work hard, but would rather give orders than receive them.  They should avoid jobs that encompass too much routine, and should move toward jobs in which their self-reliance can be an asset.
People born in the Year of the Dragon like to spend money and are charitable themselves as well as with others.  Many Dragon people will take big chances with their finances.  It is very rare that they remain poor for long.  They will always be straightforward in financial dealings and can always be trusted. Source: Spring Greeting Cards

THE CHINESE DRAGON

Chinese dragons are legendary creatures in Chinese mythology and folklore, with mythic counterparts among Japanese, Korean, Vietnamese, Bhutanese, Western and Turkic dragons. In Chinese art, dragons are typically portrayed as long, scaled, serpentine creatures with four legs. In yin and yang terminology, a dragon is yang and complements a yin fenghuang (“Chinese phoenix”).

In contrast to European dragons, which are considered evil, Chinese dragons traditionally symbolize potent and auspicious powers, particularly control over water, rainfall, hurricane, and floods. The dragon is also a symbol of power, strength, and good luck. With this, the Emperor of China usually uses the dragon as a symbol of his imperial power. Historically, the dragon was the symbol of the Emperor of China. While depictions of the dragon in art and literature are largely consistent throughout the cultures in which it is found, there are some regional differences.
From its origins as totems or the stylized depiction of natural creatures, the Chinese dragon evolved to become a mythical animal. Many pictures of oriental dragons show a flaming pearl under their chin. The pearl is associated with wealth, good luck, and prosperity. Chinese dragons are strongly associated with water in popular belief. They are believed to be the rulers of moving bodies of water, such as waterfalls, rivers, or seas. The dragon is one of the 12 animals in the Chinese zodiac which is used to designate years in the Chinese calendar. It is thought that each animal is associated with certain personality traits. Dragon years are usually the most popular to have babies. There are more babies born in Dragon years than in any other animal years of the Zodiac. Source: Wikipedia.

HAPPY NEW YEAR 4710!

Comments
  1. […] 2012: The Year of the Dragon (marciokenobi.wordpress.com) […]

  2. […] 2012: The Year of the Dragon (marciokenobi.wordpress.com) […]

  3. Lita Flores R. says:

    Las fotos de la chica afgana, sirvieron en la facultad de periodismo en que estudié para dar varias clases sobre Afganistán, costumbres, fotografía, etc.
    Tienes fotos realmente bonitas.
    Lita

    • mkenobi says:

      Algunas imágenes están en el inconsciente colectivo de la humanidad para siempre.
      La foto de la niña afgana és una de ellas.
      Gracias por su visita, amiga.

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